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As I mentioned in my presentation at the ETA Conference on Saturday, I have run multiple PD sessions on The Craft of Writing in 2018.

However, to fit within the constraints of a one hour presentation, I had to consolidate and edit my previous PD sessions on this module. This meant inevitably cutting many slides!

So, I have decided to release the additional slides here, for those of you who are keen for a few more ideas. You will notice that in previous Craft of Writing sessions, I have covered other prescribed texts: ‘Politics and the English Language’, Noel Pearson and JK Rowling’s speeches, and Carol Chan’s poem, ‘Popcorn’. I have included some MTV routines, and made some suggestions about where these texts could be placed in Module A and Module B programs in order to teach them concurrently.

In Saturday’s presentation I argued that the best place for the Craft of Writing prescribed texts was in the Common Module: Texts and Human Experiences. After a year of thinking on it, I definitely maintain that this is the most effective programming approach. However, I’m the first to acknowledge it is by no means the only way to go.

In any case, I think it is best to adopt an approach that firstly sees the Craft of Writing texts integrated into the teaching of the other Modules, before being taught discretely in a 3-4 week intensive block.

You can download the presentation slides and session handout from my presentation at the 2018 ETA Conference, and the additional slides using the links below:

Posted
AuthorEmily Bosco
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Reimagined Narratives: A Study of Truth, Power, and Perspective introduces students to the ways that the imaginative re-creation of culturally significant stories can enrich our understanding of how we read, interpret, and write these stories in new and contemporary contexts. 

The study provides students the opportunity for close engagement with the following paired texts: 

  • ‘Odysseus Tale: The Underworld’ from Homer’s The Odyssey, ‘Inferno 26’ from Dante’s The Divine Comedy, and Alfred Lord Tennyson’s ‘Ulysses’ 
  • Ovid’s ‘Orpheus and Eurydice’ and Carol Ann Duffy’s ‘Eurydice’
  • ‘The Life of S. George Martyr’ from Jacobus de Voragine’s The Golden Legend, Paolo Uccello’s ‘St George and the Dragon’ and U.A. Fanthorpe’s ‘Not My Best Side’

Through examining the connections between these texts in critical and creative ways, students will come to a deeper understanding of the ways that ideas about truth, power, and perspective are generated through the reading process. 

This student book is of definite benefit to teachers programming for the Year 11 Common Module - Reading to Write: Transition to Senior English as it:

  • Is a complete unit of work
  • Includes a variety of engaging classroom activities that develop student skills in comprehension, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of texts
  • Includes texts regarded as quality literature
  • Includes texts that represent a variety of cultural, social, and gender perspectives
  • Provides access to the full text of literary works covered throughout the book.

Be sure to take a look inside by downloading the sample pages.

This title is currently available in eBook format. You can purchase it here.

This student book is a study of influential heroic figures from literature, history, society, and culture.

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Designed to fulfill the requirements of the NSW Stage 6 English Year 11 Common Module - Reading to Write: Transition to Senior English, this student book provides students with an enjoyable, accessible, and detailed study of foundational literary heroes, the mythology that surrounds them, and the theoretical paradigms that seek to explain how we can read and write the hero's journey.

The texts covered include: Oedipus Rex, Romulus and Remus, Odysseus and the Cyclops, Sohrab and Rustum, Goblin Market, The Man from Snowy River, Louisa Lawson's Speech to the Dawn Club, and a variety of texts related to the Aboriginal Australian, Truganini.

This student book is of definite benefit to teachers programming for the Year 11 Common Module - Reading to Write: Transition to Senior English as it:

  • Is a complete unit of work
  • Includes a variety of engaging classroom activities that develop student skills in comprehension, analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of texts
  • Provides access to the full text of literary works covered throughout the book.

Be sure to take a look inside by downloading the sample pages.

My article entitled Empowering Young Writers was published as this month's 'Literacy Corner' feature article in The Australian Education Times!

The article offers advice to parents and teachers about narrative writing, which could be the chosen text type for the 2014 NAPLAN writing test. 

At present, I am in the middle of a "Page to Screen" unit with my Year 8 English class. We have been studying Brian Selznick's "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" and will soon be moving onto the evaluating how this has been translated onto the silver screen by Martin Scorsese.

As a bridge in between we have been composing short creative writing pieces, either in relation to images from the book, chosen images or pieces of music. I thought I'd share with you some of the examples of writing that my Year 8s have composed and how we have subsequently gone through them as a class and analysed how they have used different forms of imagery to creative variety and to make the piece more immersive and atmospheric.

Posted
AuthorAnthony Bosco

Narrative Structure of a T.V. Sitcom


In order to make a 22-minute (30 mins with commercials) T.V. Sitcom (Situational Comedy) both interesting and amusing, the writers of the show must follow very strict guidelines in terms of plot structure.

Above is a diagram, known as Freyatg’s Triangle, which explains how the plot of a T.V. Sitcom is structured.

Events in any episode, of any T.V. Sitcom, are structured approximately as follows:

BEGINNING:

1-3mins = The audience sees the characters in their “normal” state of existence. They are doing ordinary things like watching teleview (cf. The Simpsons), or having breakfast in the kitchen (cf. Two and a Half Men) or arriving home from work (cf. King of Queens). Within this first few minutes a disruption or complication is introduced that drives the action of that episode; this is known as the “incentive moment”.

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4-18mins = This is a period of mounting conflict. The disruption or complication gives way to “rising action”; the characters work to resolve their problem and get their lives back to normal. In the process of trying to solve their problem, the characters encounter increasingly difficult obstacles and conflicts. For example, the cast of Futurama have been employed to deliver a package to a distant planet and in the course of doing this they are help captive by violent space aliens; Throughout the episode they must overcome increasingly more difficult challenges in order to free themselves and get back home; At around the 18min mark they will face up against their final and most difficult challenge, such as the leader of the aliens.

By increasing the intensity of the difficulty faced by the characters, the show is using a technique called “accumulation”.  In theory, it should get funnier as the show goes on.  

When the “accumulation” peaks, it is known as desis; this is the most intense and difficult moment for the characters in the episode. Ideally, it is also the funniest moment or “the big laugh” of the episode.

19-22mins = Once the show has “peaked”, the audience will rapidly lose interest. So, the show must be wrapped up quickly. In these final few minutes, we see the characters resolve their difficulties and differences. Then; denouement  or moral of the story is revealed. The “falling action” leads to a happy resolution for all the characters by the end of the episode. Once the Sitcom episode is over, there is almost never any consequences or lasting effects for the characters to deal with. Comedy is really about “getting away with it”, whilst Drama is about “dealing with things when they go wrong”.

Posted
AuthorAnthony Bosco